beaches tagged posts

Six of Australia’s Best Beaches

Australia's Best Beaches

Whitehaven Beach

Around the world’s largest island, life is a beach. Actually about 12,000 beaches and not just any old beaches.  Australia has some of the world’s best with fine quartz sand created from its ancient granite rocks and pulverized shells. Its clean oceans are renowned for rolling surf, the envy of board riders around the world, and its massive reef systems teem with marine life. Many beaches are protected by national parks and have scenic headlands and coastal dunes with vegetation that ranges from tropical to temperate.

Before jumping in the deep end, a word of warning. These visions of paradise can be treacherous.  Always swim between the red and yellow flags (460 beaches are patrolled), which designate safe and supervised areas, and remember to use sunscreen and wear sun protection.

Bondi...

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The Best Oahu Adventures Outside of Waikiki

Swimming with Turtles on Oahu's North Shore

Oahu is Hawaii’s most visited island and it has so much more to offer than the high-rise resorts of Waikiki along the island’s south coast.

Sure the big winter waves on Oahu’s North Shore have a huge reputation in the professional surfing world but there are also many and varied outdoor experiences all over the island for the rest of us mere mortals.

Here is a guide to the best natural adventures. Oahu is actually bigger than you might think and quite mountainous so it is best to group your experiences in the four quadrants of the compass.

Oahu’s West Coast (Leeward side)

Just six of...

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How to Weekend in the Hamptons: where to stay and what to do

A classic cedar shingled beach house in the Hamptons on Long Island

A classic cedar shingled beach house in the Hamptons

If you don’t have your mansion, summer share house or cottage, it can be difficult to access the Hamptons for just a weekend. Luckily there a few new artful country inns and boutique hotels so now we can all escape New York and enjoy a Hamptons weekend getaway. Here is the rundown on where to stay and what to do.

I checked out a couple recently with my oldest daughter, grown up and living in New York, to see if the weekend boutique hotel experience is all its cracked up to be. They may be a bit pricey but it’s nothing compared to summer house rentals.

Prices in the Hamptons can really take your breath away….Beyonce paid US$400,000 to rent a 14-bedroom mansion for one month; if you were so inclined, you could have bought the same five hectare estate with pool, tennis court, bowling alley, theater and eight-car garage for US$43.5 million. Yet, in spite of its excesses, much of The Hamptons’ appeal is priceless.

Vistas of translucent light over dune grasses to the sea attracted artists more than a century ago to this 50-kilometer stretch dotted with a handful of villages on the eastern end of Long Island. New York Society followed, building grand cedar-shingled mansions on the potato fields and riding horse buggies down its rose-rimmed country lanes to the beach.

In additio...

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Photo Friday: outrigger canoe in Papua New Guinea

PHoto Friday outrigger

I took this photo while on a multi-day, 80-kilometer kayaking trip in Papua New Guinea with Australian-owned No Roads Expeditions.

My husband and I and our three teenage daughters paddled alongside the Tigak and Tsoi islands – coral atolls with swaying coconut palms that meander from the main island of New Ireland to the brooding jungle-covered hulk of Lavongai.

One day, I paddled with local guide, Lapin who couldn’t wait to show us his home on Nusakelo. “I love my island – the wide sandy beach, the orchard and vegetable garden, the coral reef,” he says quietly. “Can you believe an American found Nusakelo on Google Maps and tried to buy it for $70,000? We said ‘No.’ because we want to keep it just the way it is.”

Lapin’s relatives arrive in outriggers, painted the same delicate turquoise as the surrounding sea. They brought the day’s catch for our lunch. This photo is of one of their outriggers left on the side of the lagoon.

New Guinea is a surprising place...

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Photo Friday: Is this the most beautiful beach in the world

You can have Champagne Beach all to yourself on Fiji's Yasawa Island

Is this the most beautiful beach in the world?

I took this photo on Champagne Beach in the remote Yasawa Islands off the northwest coast of the main island of Viti Levu in Fiji.  It is a huge arc of fine pinkish sand which surrounds a wide bay of aquamarine water. At each end are small reefs where you can snorkel to see myriad brightly colored tropical fish and hard and soft corals.

Even better, most of the time you have the whole beach to yourselves save for an occasional fisherman.

So how do you get here to enjoy it?

Yasawa Island Resort: home to the world’s most beautiful beaches

It is one of 11 pristine beaches that are available to guests of Yasawa Island Resort, one of Fiji’s most upscale one-island resorts located on one of the country’s most unspoiled islands. Although remote, it is just a 30-minute flight from Nadi International Airport to the resort’s private airstrip.

Yasawa is a standout in Fiji because of its absolutely spectacular beaches...

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What to Do Along the Great Ocean Road: beaches, forests, coastal towns

Victoria's Great Ocean Road is one of the world's great drives

Photo by Robert Blackburn

Not the ok ocean road or the good ocean road, Victoria is home to the GREAT Ocean Road, one of the world’s most scenic coastal drives that spans 243 km of Victoria’s stunning coastline southwest of Melbourne.

All too often visitors zip past The Great Ocean Road’s spectacular beaches, zigzag around its jagged cliffs, plough through its soaring rainforests, and scarcely make a pit-stop in its pretty beach towns in their rush to get to the 12 Apostles.

If the truth...

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Saffire Freycinet: Tasmanian Luxury Lodge by a Secluded Beach

Saffire Freycinet on Great Oyster Bay in Tasmania

I have always thought that Tasmania’s Saffire Freycinet is one of Australia’s finest luxury lodges, not only because it is in a stellar location by a secluded beach but also because it offers exceptional intuitive service and a wide range of luxury experiences.

Tasmania’s Saffire Freycinet was named 2014 Grand Award Winner in Andrew Harper’s world renowned luxury Hideaway Report. Harper describes Saffire Freycinet as a “superb contemporary 20-room resort nestled in a eucalyptus forest beside Great Oyster Bay. Floor-to-ceiling windows in three-story main lodge grant magnificent views of the pink-hued Hazards Mountains across the bay.”

This is another huge stamp of international approval for Luxury Lodges of Australia, which is a collection of independent luxury lodges and camps offering unforgettable experiences in Australia’s most inspiring and extraordinary wilderness locations.

The award is richly deserved.

Saffire Freycinet offers a design-rich but low-key and sophisticated retreat in exquisite natural surroundings on the edge of Tasmania’s Freycinet Peninsula. The name itself conjures up its setting with the merging of the sapphire blue waters of Coles Bay with the fiery hues of the pink granite Hazard Mountain Range at sunset…ergo the jewel of Tasmania.

With its swooping stingray-shaped roof, its dramatic ceiling made of ribbed golden celery-top pine and its wall of windows overlooking the water and mountains, the main lodge makes a grand statement but is also warm and welcoming. The lounge area offers comfortable couches and chairs, with Tasmanian Huon pine stumps for tables, lots of games and a long gas fireplace providing warmth in wild and wintry weather.

While the design is stunning, it is...

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Photo Friday: The Spectacular Great Ocean Walk

VICTORIA-end-of-the-Great-Ocean-Walk

I took this picture at the Twelve Apostle’s end of The Great Ocean Walk. I think this image demonstrates just how wonderful it is to be away from the bus loads of tourists while appreciating the spectacular views of the limestone stacks.

It is an almost mythic land and seascape of sweeping beaches, serrated cliffs and misty rainforests that begs to be appreciated at a walker’s pace. Yet this virulent stretch of Victorian coastline has always been known as one of the world’s great DRIVES along The Great Ocean ROAD.

In 1994 a group of locals had a vision to offer something more and the passion to make it a reality. Today the 100-kilometer Great Ocean Walk between Apollo Bay and the 12 Apostles offers one of the finest coastal walks in the world. It traverses a secret landscape left behind as the Great Ocean Road weaves away from the coast through forest and farmland in its rush to reach the 12 Apostles...

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Eyre Peninsula Seafood Trail: tuna, oysters, lobster and more

Port Lincoln is the tuna capital of Australia

Slurping down a sweet Coffin Bay Pacific oyster at Port Lincoln Fresh Fish Place as workers shuck them at lightning speed, I ask owner Craig McCathie what it is about the Eyre Peninsula that makes the seafood here so special.

“On one side you have the warm saline waters of Spencer Gulf, which are ideal for prawns, calamari, and blue crabs, and on the other side are the cold, high-nutrient waters of the Great Australian Bight where southern bluefin tuna, snapper, and squid hang out,” he explains. “There are also the shallow estuaries, which are perfect for oysters, garfish and whiting. And let’s not forget the abalone, which live on the rugged limestone rocks. There is such an incredible diversity of environments for sea life and the waters are pristine along this isolated coastline.”

Then...

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Photo Friday: Walking California’s Point Reyes National Seashore

Walking along the Point Reyes National Seashore

I took this picture of a couple of avid walkers of a certain age along the Tomales Point Trail on the Point Reyes National Seashore in West Marin.

This spectacular stretch of wild coastline offers one of the world’s great day walks from historic Pierce Point Ranch to the end of Tomales Point with its stunning views over both the Pacific Ocean and the entrance to Tomales Bay, which is right on the San Andreas fault line above San Francisco. Along the way you will see waves crashing along cliffs and windswept beaches and small herds of native tule elk grazing on the lush green hillsides. In springtime, entire hillsides are blanketed with California poppies, wild iris and mustard flowers while overhead hawks and kestrels ride the wind currents looking for small animals.

This landscape could so easily have been destroyed if it were not for a broad ranging group of conservationists, farmers, ranchers, widows, politicians and volunteers who fought a hard-won battle between 1950 to 1970 to p...

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