Lima’s Exciting Restaurant Scene

MFP new world food

The hottest restaurant destination in South America, Lima was once a mere launching pad for trips to Machu Picchu or the Amazon. Today this gourmet melting pot is luring the world’s foodies with its mind-boggling array of local seafood, potatoes, corn, grains, chillies and exotic tropical fruits enlivened by its melange of indigenous, Spanish, Chinese and Japanese cultures.

Mistura food festival

The Mistura food festival, which, appropriately, means mixture in Spanish, is held in Lima every September.  South America’s largest food festival, it has put Peru on the world food stage. When invited chefs like Rene Redzepi, Ferran Adria and Michel Bras get so excited about what is going on here the word spreads. Mistura takes a broad approach to food, which is why it is so much fun. It is a rich cultural feast with street food, farmers, celebrity chefs, folk dances, restaurants, artisanal products, even a chocolate market and a section dedicated to Pisco, Peru’s famed grape brandy...

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Four of the Best Sydney Harbourside Walks

Sydney Harbour walks mfp

Sydney may be a city of five million people but it also has more than 400 hectares of natural harbor waterfront that is best accessed by a remarkable network of walking trails.

We can thank the early colonists’ fear of being invaded for the creation of the Sydney Harbour National Park, which was established in the 1970s when numerous military and naval installations on prime harbor-front property were decommissioned.

Today, in conjunction with a patchwork of local preserves, you can walk through stands of Sydney red gums, she oaks, heath land and sub-tropical rainforest alive with native bird life, explore fascinating historical sites and enjoy jaw-dropping harbour views. Not only that, there are aboriginal middens and rock art as well as secluded beaches far from the madding crowds. Many of the trails also pass alongside some downright spectacular waterfront mansions so you can get your fix of the lifestyles of the rich and famous too!

Taronga Z...

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Ten Reasons to Use a Guide Rather than a Guidebook

Peter Miller meeting the local kids at a sea gypsy village off the island of Flores in Indonesia

Peter Miller with the local kids at a sea gypsy village off the island of Flores in Indonesia

This is a guest post by Peter Miller, the founder and managing director of No Roads Expeditions.

Like most people, when I travel, I like to understand what I am seeing. I am always asking What is that? Why is that? Who is that? What’s in that? Where is that? The list is endless.

Before guidebooks became fashionable in the 80’s and the internet became ubiquitous in the mid 2000’s, those of us who wanted to understand what they were seeing employed the services of a living, breathing and intelligent human being. That’s right, there are those among us that are passionate about the world we live and work in and we want to share our s encyclopaedic knowledge of places we love. And at the same time organize things for you, introduce you to locals, immerse you in the environment you are traveling in so that at the end of the trip, you understand the place like you could never understand it by reading a book.

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Amangiri Hotel: Sleek Architecture in the Utah Desert

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Its location is certainly far from Adrian Zecha’s usual hangouts but then Aman is always pushing the boundaries of what defines a great hotel and where it might be located. The multi-award-winning Amangiri, which means ‘peaceful mountain’, is wedged into 600 acres of raw mesa-dotted desert in Southern Utah, not far from the Arizona border.  One of Aman’s most popular properties, Amangiri is all about sleek, minimalist architecture which reflects the drama of the Utah desert. This is only the second Aman property in North America, the first being Amangani in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

In classic Aman fa...

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The Rowley Shoals: Australia’s Secret Underwater Paradise

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In the middle of the open ocean I’m flying along a coral channel whose water is so clear I could be a large black bird finning through the sky. Below me giant clams flash by with their gaudy dance hall smiles, aquamarine parrot fish nibble on coral bommies, white-tipped reef sharks lurk in shadows and schools of tiny neon-bright yellow fish dart amongst intricate coralline structures.

Just ahead, I try to catch up with the “Hey Dude” turtle in Little Nemo. Only we are nowhere near the Eastern Australian Current on the Great Barrier Reef.

What and where are the Rowley Shoals?

Fourteen of us are drift snorkeling on the other side of the continent at the Rowley Shoals, 250 kilometers northwest of Broome. They are three tear-drop-shaped reefs which thrust up a dizzying 400 meters from the ocean floor on the edge of the world’s widest continental shelf. This reef ride is one of the few in the world that is courtesy of a five-meter tide, which rises and falls in six hours...

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Barging on France’s Canal du Midi

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I confess I’ve always had a fantasy about canal barging in France…gliding slowly alongside sunflowers and vines, biking to local bakeries, lunching at canal-side cafés, and snoozing away balmy afternoons. No more rushing about not appreciating France’s bucolic riches: our family of five travel a mere 157 kilometres in seven days along the Canal du Midi.

The boat

We start our journey at the Le Boat Company’s port in Castelnaudary, near Toulouse, where a staffer gives us a 15-minute boat handling class. “Yep, we understand how to go forward, reverse and sideways; sure, we’ll remember how to swivel and jiggle the toilet pump for the requisite flushing into the canal…nope we won’t be swimming there;  yes, we see how to fill the water tank and hook up for power. Mais, bien sur, we’ll stick to the speed limit. What is it again…eight kilometers an hour?”

After a full inspection of the 11.5-meter Tango barge boat, we are mightily impressed with its design...

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Photo Friday: outrigger canoe in Papua New Guinea

PHoto Friday outrigger

I took this photo while on a multi-day, 80-kilometer kayaking trip in Papua New Guinea with Australian-owned No Roads Expeditions.

My husband and I and our three teenage daughters paddled alongside the Tigak and Tsoi islands – coral atolls with swaying coconut palms that meander from the main island of New Ireland to the brooding jungle-covered hulk of Lavongai.

One day, I paddled with local guide, Lapin who couldn’t wait to show us his home on Nusakelo. “I love my island – the wide sandy beach, the orchard and vegetable garden, the coral reef,” he says quietly. “Can you believe an American found Nusakelo on Google Maps and tried to buy it for $70,000? We said ‘No.’ because we want to keep it just the way it is.”

Lapin’s relatives arrive in outriggers, painted the same delicate turquoise as the surrounding sea. They brought the day’s catch for our lunch. This photo is of one of their outriggers left on the side of the lagoon.

New Guinea is a surprising place...

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Sunshine Coast Hinterland Gourmet Hike

There's a jungle out there in the Sunshine Coast hinterland

Most people think the Sunny Coast is all about beaches and alfresco dining in Noosa, Mooloolaba and Caloundra but an entire alternative ecosystem is tucked into the folds of its ancient mountain ranges. In fact, there’s a whole jungle to explore in the Sunshine Coast hinterland…and some mighty fine raw materials for a gourmet getaway.

Black and white dairy cows graze on lime-green pastures. Avocado and macadamia trees burst out of the red earth. Ridge-top gardens peer over the Glasshouse Mountains to the blue Pacific and a family of distinctive villages beckons, each as idiosyncratic as other people’s children.

Two of the Great Walks of Queensland are here too. The 58-kilometer Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk and the 56-kilometer Conondale Range Great Walk rumble through the jungle to the evocative soundtrack of tropical birds and cicadas.

Narrows Escape Rainforest Lodge

Narrow Escape Rainforest Retreat partners with Off Beat Eco Tours to offer a gourmet hiking adventure

Hardy hikers bunk down in campsites along the way but for those of us who prefer our walking in the wild wi...

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Jean Michel Cousteau is Fiji’s best eco, family and diving resort

Jean Michel Cousteau Resort  is renowned for  its eco credentials and wonderful kids program

Fiji’s award-winning environmentally responsible Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort, Fiji is built on 17 acres of a former coconut plantation overlooking the peaceful waters of Savusavu Bay on Vanua Levu Island. With one of the most impressive and engaging kids clubs in the world as well as an extensive array of adventure and pampering offerings, it is an exclusive escape for couples, families, and discerning travellers looking for an authentic Fijian experience.

Arrival and Location

It is a one-hour flight from Nadi or Suva. Guests are met at the tiny airport on Vanua Levu and given cool towels and cold water before being whisked away to the resort in a comfortable four wheel drive.

A group of...

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Tasmania’s radical contemporary Museum of Old and New Art

Tasmania's Museum of Old and New Art.

Tasmania’s MONA on the banks of the Derwent River.
Photo credit: Leigh Carmichael

Tasmania’s $75 million Museum of Old and New Art is the must-see destination in the island state once more famous for its dramatic landscapes and outdoor adventures. It seems like everybody, from European art buffs to everyday mums and dads, is abuzz about MONA, located in a subterranean sandstone structure on the banks of the Derwent River in Hobart. The largest private museum in Australia, MONA offers indoor adventures that rival New York’s edgiest galleries.

It is also no one trick pony since it is wedged into cliffs on the vine-dotted grounds of the Moorilla Estate winery which has a wine bar, cellar door for wine tastings and Moo Brew beer tastings, a fancy French-inspired restaurant and eight contemporary accommodation pavilions.

MONA has also spawned a slew of fabulous festivals and markets that bring a kaleidoscope of locals, interstate and international visitors to this creative mecca that just so happens to be located in an industrial suburb on the outskirts of a small city on the tip of the Southern Hemisphere.

 

David...

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